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Travel Security Advice for the Central African Republic

 

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COUNTRY DESCRIPTION:

The Central African Republic (CAR) is one of the world’s least developed nations and has experienced several periods of political instability since independence from France in 1960.  Despite an on-going peace process and the presence of a democratically-elected government in the capital, Bangui, rebels still control large portions of the country's northern provinces, and highway bandits prey on civilians and travelers in much of western CAR.  In the Dzanga-Sangha National Park in the southwest, facilities for tourists are being developed but remain limited.  Read the Department of State Background Notes on the Central African Republic for additional information.

ENTRY/EXIT REQUIREMENTS:

A valid passport, visa, and evidence of yellow fever vaccination are required for entry.  Travelers should obtain the latest information and details from the Embassy of the Central African Republic, 1618 22nd Street NW, Washington, DC 20008, telephone: (202) 483–7800 / 7801, fax: (202) 332–9893.  Overseas, inquiries should be made to the nearest Central African Republic Embassy or Consulate.  NOTE: In any country where there is no Central African Republic diplomatic mission, the French Embassy has authorization to issue a visa for entry into the Central African Republic.

Information about dual nationality or the prevention of international child abduction can be found on our website.  For further information about customs regulations, please read our Customs Information Sheet.

SAFETY AND SECURITY:

See the Department of State’s Travel Warning for the CAR.

For the latest security information, Americans traveling abroad should regularly monitor the Department of State, Bureau of Consular Affairs’ web sitewhere the current Travel Warnings and Travel Alerts, as well as the Worldwide Caution, can be found.

Up-to-date information on safety and security can also be obtained by calling 1-888-407-4747 toll-free in the U.S. and Canada or, for callers outside the U.S. and Canada, a regular toll line at 1-202-501-4444.  These numbers are available from 8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. Eastern Time, Monday through Friday (except U.S. federal holidays).

The Department of State urges American citizens to take responsibility for their own personal security while traveling overseas.  For general information about appropriate measures travelers can take to protect themselves in an overseas environment, see the Department of State’s information on A Safe Trip Abroad.

CRIME:

Crime remains a significant problem in the capital, Bangui, though it has decreased notably in recent years.  Americans should exercise caution while traveling around the city and immediate environs.  Petty theft remains a problem in large market areas, particularly in the crowded markets near KM 5 on the outskirts of the city.  Armed gangs may operate in outlying residential areas.  During previous periods of civil unrest and civil conflict, including most recently in 2002 and 2003, foreign mercenaries and citizens engaged in widespread looting and damaged much of the city’s infrastructure.  In the northern and western parts of the country, there are consistent reports of armed robbery and kidnapping by highway bandits (called “coupeurs de routes” or “zaraguinas”), especially during the December to May dry season.  When a crime does occur in Bangui, the victim may have to pay to send a vehicle to pick up police officers due to the shortage of police vehicles and fuel.

INFORMATION FOR VICTIMS OF CRIME:

The loss or theft abroad of a U.S. passport should be reported immediately to the local police and the nearest U.S. embassy or consulate.  If you are the victim of a crime while overseas, in addition to reporting to local police, please contact the nearest U.S. embassy or consulate for assistance.  The embassy/consulate staff can, for example, help you find appropriate medical care, contact family members or friends and explain how funds could be transferred.  Although the investigation and prosecution of the crime is solely the responsibility of local authorities, consular officers can help you to understand the local criminal justice process and to find an attorney if needed.

There is no local equivalent to the “911” emergency line in the CAR.

Please see our information on Victims of Crime, including possible victim compensation programs in the United States.

CRIMINAL PENALTIES:

While in a foreign country, a U.S. citizen is subject to that country's laws and regulations, which sometimes differ significantly from those in the United States and may not afford the protections available to the individual under U.S. law.  Penalties for breaking the law can be more severe than in the United States for similar offenses.  Persons violating Central African laws, even unknowingly, may be expelled, arrested or imprisoned.  Penalties for possession, use, or trafficking in illegal drugs in the CAR are severe, and convicted offenders can expect long jail sentences and heavy fines.  Engaging in sexual conduct with children or using or disseminating child pornography in a foreign country is a crime, prosecutable in the United States.  Please see our information on Criminal Penalties.

SPECIAL CIRCUMSTANCES:

PHOTOGRAPHY: Taking photographs of police or military installations, or any other government buildings, is prohibited.  Unauthorized photography may result in the seizure of photographic equipment by CAR authorities.  Police or other government authorities can provide information and grant permission for photographing a particular subject or location. 

CORRUPTION: Corruption remains a serious problem among CAR security forces, some members of which have harassed travelers for bribes and small amounts of money.  At night, the roads in the capital are often manned with impromptu checkpoints, at which police or other military members ask motorists and travelers for money.  

BANKING: Banking infrastructure remains limited in the CAR, and facilities for monetary exchange exist only in the capital.  There are no ATMs in the CAR, and exchange bureaus normally accept dollars and euros but not West African Francs (CFA).

MEDICAL FACILITIES AND HEALTH INFORMATION:

Medical facilities are extremely limited in the CAR, and the quality of acute care is unreliable.  Sanitation levels are low.  Many medicines are not available; travelers should carry properly labeled prescription drugs and other medications with them.

The U.S. Department of State is unaware of any HIV/AIDS entry restrictions for visitors to or foreign residents of the CAR.

For information about outbreaks of infectious diseases abroad, consult the
World Health Organization's (WHO) web siteFurther health information for travelers is available from the WHO.

MEDICAL INSURANCE:

The Department of State strongly urges Americans to consult with their medical insurance company prior to traveling abroad to confirm whether their policy applies overseas and whether it will cover emergency expenses such as a medical evacuation.  Please see our information on medical insurance overseas.

TRAFFIC SAFETY AND ROAD CONDITIONS:

While in a foreign country, U.S. citizens may encounter road conditions that differ significantly from those in the United States.  The information below concerning the CAR is provided for general reference only, and may not be totally accurate in a particular location or circumstance.

In Bangui, road conditions vary, and many roads have large holes and degraded points that prevent the normal flow of traffic.  Only a small portion of the roads in the country, including in the capital, are paved, and many of the compacted dirt roads have been degraded.  Drivers tend to prefer to drive on the smoothest portion of the road and ignore basic traffic laws, thus slowing the flow of traffic and increasing the risk of collision.  The city of Bangui does have a public transportation system consisting of green buses and yellow taxis, though these vehicles are often dangerously overcrowded and very badly maintained.

Due to the risk of armed attacks on motorists in the northern and western regions of the country, overland travel in these areas should be avoided.  Any driving outside the capital should be only during daylight hours.  Most remote areas in the CAR that are frequented by tourists are accessible only by four-wheel drive vehicles, although some roads are not passable at all during the rainy season, from May to October.

Please refer to our
Road Safety page for more information.

AVIATION SAFETY OVERSIGHT:

As there is no direct commercial air service to the United States by carriers registered in the CAR, the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has not assessed the government of the CAR's Civil Aviation Authority for compliance with International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) aviation safety standards.  Further information may be found on the FAA's web site.

REGISTRATION / EMBASSY LOCATION:

The U.S. Embassy in Bangui resumed operations in January 2005, following the evacuation of all American staff in 2002 during the civil conflict and looting in Bangui in 2002.  The Embassy’s American presence increased in 2006, and a new American Ambassador to the CAR presented his credentials to President Bozize in 2007.  Nonetheless, the Embassy continues to operate with limited staffing, and can only provide basic services to American citizens in the CAR.

Americans living or traveling in the CAR are encouraged to register with the U.S. Embassy through the State Department’s travel registration web site so that they can obtain updated information on travel and security within the CAR.  Americans without Internet access may register directly with the U.S. Embassy in the CARBy registering, American citizens make it easier for the Embassy or Consulate to contact them in case of emergency.  The U.S. Embassy is located on Avenue David Dacko, B.P. 924, Bangui, tel: 2161-0200; fax: 2161-4494.

This replaces the Country Specific Information for the Central African Republic dated April 1, 2008, without substantive changes.

 

 


 

There is a Travel Warning for the Central African Republic HERE.....

The UK Foreign & Commonwealth Office has information regarding the Central African Republic HERE...

Looking for an Embassy ?, You can also check out our World Wide Embassy Listings Section HERE (For US Citizens) or HERE (For UK Citizens)...........

Regards

The SW Team...

 

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