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Travel Security Advice for Ecuador

 

Ecuadorian_National_flag

ecuador_mapEcuador_Overview


 

 

 

COUNTRY DESCRIPTION:

Ecuador is a Spanish-speaking country about the size of Colorado.  It has a developing economy and a democratically elected government.  Ecuador is geographically and ethnically diverse.  In general, tourist facilities are adequate but vary in quality.  Ecuador adopted the U.S. dollar as its official currency in 2000.  Both U.S. coins and Ecuadorian coins, which are equivalent to the value of the U.S. coins, are used.  Read the Department of State Background Notes on Ecuador for additional information.

ENTRY/EXIT REQUIREMENTS:

A U.S. passport with remaining validity of at least six months is required to enter Ecuador. A valid U.S. passport is required to depart Ecuador.  Tourists must also provide evidence of return or onward travel.  U.S. citizens traveling on regular passports for tourism or business do not need a visa for a stay of 90 days or less.  Those planning a longer visit must obtain a visa in advance of arrival.  Travelers who stay in Ecuador beyond the allowed entry time are charged a substantial fine and are barred from re-entering Ecuador for six months from the date of departure.  A valid U.S. passport is required to depart Ecuador.  Payment of an airport exit tax is also required when departing Ecuador.

U.S. citizens whose passports are lost or stolen in Ecuador must obtain a new passport at the U.S. Embassy in Quito or the U.S. Consulate General in Guayaquil and present it, together with a police report of the loss or theft, to the main immigration offices in those cities prior to arriving at the airport in order to obtain permission to depart.

Ecuador’s exit procedures mandate that minors (under the age of 18) who are citizens or residents of Ecuador and who are traveling alone, with one parent, or with a third party, must present a copy of their birth certificate and written authorization from the absent parent(s) or legal guardian.  When a parent is deceased, a notarized copy of the death certificate is required in lieu of the written authorization.  If documents are prepared in the United States, the authorization and the birth certificate must be translated into Spanish, notarized and authenticated by the Ecuadorian Embassy or an Ecuadorian Consulate in the United States.  It is not uncommon for local authorities to insist that these documents be apostilled (authenticated).  Documents must be apostilled by the same U.S. state that issued the document.  If the documents are prepared in Ecuador, only notarization by an Ecuadorian notary is required.  This paragraph does not apply to children who enter Ecuador with U.S. passports as tourists, unless they hold dual U.S./Ecuadorian citizenship.

For further information regarding entry, exit, and customs requirements, travelers should contact the Ecuadorian Embassy at 2535 15th Street NW, Washington, DC 20009, telephone (202) 234-7166; or one of the Ecuadorian Consulates in Chicago (312) 338-1002/03, fax (312) 338-1004; Houston (713) 572-8731; Jersey City (201) 985-1700; Los Angeles (323) 658-5146, (323) 658-1068, fax (323) 658-1198; Miami (305) 539-8214; New Orleans (504) 523-3229; New York (212) 808-0211; or San Francisco (415) 982-1819.

Visit the Embassy of Ecuador’s web site for the most current visa information.

Information about dual nationality or the prevention of international child abduction can be found on our website.  For further information about customs regulations, please read our Customs Information Sheet.

SAFETY AND SECURITY:

The U.S. Embassy in Quito advises caution when traveling to the northern border region of Ecuador, to include areas in the provinces of Sucumbios, Orellana and Carchi, northern Esmeraldas, and southern Esmeraldas, south of Atacames.  U.S. government personnel are under strict limitations with respect to traveling alone and over-nighting in these areas due to the spread of organized crime, drug trafficking, small arms trafficking, and incursions by various Colombian terrorist organizations.  Since 1998, at least ten U.S. citizens have been kidnapped near Ecuador's border with Colombia.  One U.S. citizen was murdered in January 2001 by kidnappers holding him for ransom. Violent crime has significantly increased in 2008 and 2009 with American citizens being victims of crimes, including but not limited to homicides, armed assaults, robberies, sexual assaults, and home invasions.  American citizens have also been victims of violent crime on beaches, both at popular tourist destinations and in remote areas.

Political demonstrations occur frequently throughout Ecuador. Protesters often block city streets and rural highways, including major arteries such as the Pan American Highway. Public transportation is often disrupted during these events. Protesters may burn tires, throw rocks and Molotov cocktails, engage in destruction of property and detonate small improvised explosive devices during demonstrations. Police response may include water cannons and tear gas. U.S. citizens and U.S. affiliated interests are not usually targeted, but U.S. citizens are advised to avoid areas where demonstrations are in progress and to be prepared with backup transportation plans. Although political demonstrations have not been directed at foreigners in the past, visitors are reminded that peaceful demonstrations can turn violent with little or no warning.  Additionally, foreigners are prohibited from protesting in Ecuador and may be subject to arrest for participating in demonstrations of any kind.  Please see the Embassy’s security and safety page, or the security and safety page of the U.S. Consulate in Guayaquil for the latest safety and security messages.  U.S. citizens may also keep informed of daily happenings by following the local news and police reports.

Ecuadorian authorities may declare states of emergency in provinces and regions affected by civil unrest, natural disaster, or other disruptions. During states of emergency, authorities have expanded powers to restore order, including suspension of some constitutional rights, expanded detention powers, and imposition of curfews.

Radicals in various locations in Ecuador, including Quito, Guayaquil, and Cuenca, have occasionally placed small explosive devices that release political literature, known locally as pamphlet bombs. Targets have included local and international businesses and various Government of Ecuador buildings. Although no foreign tourists have been injured in these explosions, American citizens visiting or residing in Ecuador are urged to take common-sense precautions and avoid suspicious-looking packages.

U.S. citizens should carry identification at all times, including proof of U.S. citizenship.  Due to increased passport theft in Ecuador, it is recommended to carry a copy of your passport rather than the actual passport document.

Travelers to Ecuador’s beach areas should be aware that strong currents, undertow, and underwater hazards may exist and are not always posted.  Most beaches lack staffed lifeguard stations.

For information on the Galapagos Islands, please see the “Special Circumstances” section of this Country Specific Information.

For the latest security information, Americans traveling abroad should regularly monitor the Department of State, Bureau of Consular Affairs’ web site, where the current Travel Warnings and Travel Alerts, as well as the Worldwide Caution, can be found.

Up-to-date information on safety and security can also be obtained by calling 1-888-407-4747 toll-free in the U.S. and Canada or, for callers outside the U.S. and Canada, a regular toll line at 1-202-501-4444.  These numbers are available from 8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. Eastern Time, Monday through Friday (except U.S. federal holidays).

The Department of State urges American citizens to take responsibility for their own personal security while traveling overseas.  For general information about appropriate measures travelers can take to protect themselves in an overseas environment, see the Department of State’s information on A Safe Trip Abroad.

CRIME:

Crime is a serious problem in Ecuador, and visitors should be alert and cautious.  Non-violent crime is common: hundreds of Americans are robbed every year in Ecuador.  Violent crime has increased in recent years.  Thieves and small gangs armed with guns or knives are sometimes active even in smaller cities such as Otavalo, Manta, and Cuenca.  Tourists have been robbed at gunpoint on beaches and along hiking trails, including on the well-populated trail to the summit of Pichincha Volcano in Quito.  Incidents of rape have increased, even in well-traveled tourists areas and when the victims traveled in groups for safety. Shootings, kidnappings, and carjackings are still relatively rare, but American citizens have been victimized by those crimes.  The Ecuadorian government has increased police patrols in tourist areas, but travelers should remain alert to their surroundings and maintain constant control of personal belongings.

Travelers should avoid wearing expensive-looking jewelry and watches.  Avoid deserted beaches, hiking trails, and infrequently traveled roads, as well as the interior regions of large city parks, particularly at night. Robberies on public buses are a continuing problem.  U.S. citizens are urged to exercise caution when using public transportation, particularly taxis. Robberies and assaults involving taxis present a significant safety concern, specifically in the Guayaquil area and foreigners are often targeted specifically.  The U.S. embassy recommends that U.S. citizens use radio-operated taxi companies instead of hailing taxis on the street in the Guayaquil area.  Public buses can be dangerous – from the point of view of both traffic safety and personal security.

Pickpockets and other petty thieves are particularly active in public markets, airports, bus terminals, restaurants, and crowded streets.  Backpackers are frequently targeted for robbery and “snatch and grabs;” business travelers carrying laptop computer bags are similarly targeted.  Many travelers who travel by bus store their luggage below the bus, where it is sometimes stolen.  Therefore, we recommend that you do not store your passport in your luggage. Always be aware of your surroundings, and try to not travel alone.  Thefts from vehicles are common.  Do not leave anything of value in plain view in a car, including sunglasses or sports equipment.  Carjackings have occurred in both rural and urban areas.  Visitors are advised to drive with doors locked and windows rolled up.

In Quito, travelers should be particularly alert on the crowded streets of south Quito, at the Panecillo, in Old Quito, and in the areas of El Tejar, Parroquia San Sebastian, Avenida Cristobal Colon, and Gonzalez Suarez.  The U.S. Embassy strongly discourages hiking to the summit of Pichincha as violent crime is sharply rising.  Groups as large as eight have been robbed at gunpoint by masked men; female hikers have been sexually assaulted.  The Mariscal Sucre District is a popular tourist area in Quito with numerous restaurants, bars, hotels, and shopping sites.  Since 1999, U.S. government employees and private U.S. citizens have been victimized there, prompting the U.S. Embassy to put certain bars off-limits and to declare a nighttime curfew in the area for its employees.  Increased police presence and better lighting in prime tourist squares of Old Quito have improved safety, but similar measures in the Mariscal district have not been as effective.

In Guayaquil, take extra caution in the downtown area at night, in the street market area of La Bahia, at the Christ Statue (Sagrado Corazon de Jesus) on Cerro del Carmen, in the airport area, and in the southern part of the city.  The riverfront park area called the Malecon 2000 and the passage up to the lighthouse in the Las Penas area are generally safe and well patrolled although at night caution should be observed.  There have been repeated instances of travelers followed from the airport and intercepted by robbers using two vehicles to cut off the traveler.  There is some evidence that those most at risk are people who appear to be returning from family visits laden with gifts and large amounts of cash.  There have been armed robberies of restaurants and their patrons, including in the fashionable areas of Guayaquil. Guayaquil has also experienced an increase in taxi-related crime, especially incidents known locally as "secuestro express," where taxi drivers and accomplices threaten passengers, usually with guns, and hold them captive as they drive them from ATM to ATM to withdraw the victim's money. Tourists are often the targets of these crimes, and should practice caution when selecting taxis in the Guayaquil area. Guayaquil has also experienced an increase in kidnappings for ransom, often in connection with hijackings, although tourists have not been targeted.

Criminals sometimes use incapacitating drugs such as scopolamine on unsuspecting tourists in order to rob them.  These so-called date rape drugs are put into drinks in order to drug the unsuspecting victim.  This drug can render the victim disoriented and can cause prolonged unconsciousness and serious medical problems.  Never allow a stranger to “buy” you a drink and never leave your drink unattended.  Several American citizens have reported thefts of property and sexual assaults following ingestion of such substances.

Every year, 15 to 20 American citizens are arrested for attempting to traffic drugs between Ecuador and the United States, or between mainland Ecuador and the Galapagos.  Suitcases with false bottoms and other packages are common methods of transporting illegal substances. Many of these citizens claim to have been unaware that they were transporting drugs.  As in any other country, do not accept gifts, packages, or suitcases from other persons; even trusted travel companions have been known to take advantage of their friends and family to traffic drugs through Ecuador’s airports. See the Criminal Penalties section below for more details about Ecuador strict laws and sentences regarding illegal drug trafficking.

In many countries around the world, counterfeit and pirated goods are widely available.  Transactions involving such products may be illegal under local law.  In addition, bringing them back to the United States may result in forfeitures and/or fines.  More information on this serious problem is available at the U.S. Department of Justice web site.

INFORMATION FOR VICTIMS OF CRIME:

The loss or theft abroad of a U.S. passport should be reported immediately to the local police and the nearest U.S. Embassy or Consulate.  If you are the victim of a crime while overseas, in addition to reporting to local police, please contact the nearest U.S. Embassy or Consulate for assistance.  The Embassy/Consulate staff can, for example, help you find appropriate medical care, contact family members or friends and explain how funds could be transferred.  Although the investigation and prosecution of the crime is solely the responsibility of local authorities, Consular Officers can help you to understand the local criminal justice process and to find an attorney if needed.  Female victims of crime may receive assistance from the Comisaria de la Mujer at Ave. 24 de Mayo y Calle Loja, telephone 593 2 228 4016 or the Oficina de Derechos de la Mujer, Guayanas E-331 y Inglaterra, Quito 593 2 252 9909.

The local equivalent to the emergency line in Ecuador is the same as the U.S., dial “911.” The operators typically speak Spanish only. Victims should also call the Embassy or Consulate to report the crime and for assistance.

Please see our information on Victims of Crime, including possible victim compensation programs in the United States.

CRIMINAL PENALTIES:

While in a foreign country, a U.S. citizen is subject to that country's laws and regulations, which sometimes differ significantly from those in the United States and may not afford the protections available to the individual under U.S. law.  Penalties for breaking the law can be more severe than in the United States for similar offenses.  Persons violating Ecuadorian laws, even unknowingly, may be expelled, arrested or imprisoned.  Penalties for possession, use, or trafficking in illegal drugs in Ecuador are severe, and convicted offenders can expect long jail sentences and heavy fines.  Engaging in sexual conduct with children or using or disseminating child pornography in a foreign country is a crime, prosecutable in the United States.  Please see our information on Criminal Penalties.

SPECIAL CIRCUMSTANCES:

GALAPAGOS ISLANDS:  A significant number of Ecuadorian tour vessels operating in the Galapagos Islands are neither inspected nor operated in accordance with U.S. regulations, and do not meet U.S. safety standards.  The Government of Ecuador requires that vessels carrying more than sixteen passengers comply with the International Safety Management (ISM) code established by the International Maritime Organization.  However, the quality of inspections, oversight, crewmember proficiency evaluation, and other requisites for safe vessel operation may vary substantially.  Tour boat accidents are more frequent among small vessels (those carrying fewer than sixteen passengers), but travelers should inquire about safety features of any vessel, regardless of size. When boarding vessels be sure to look for the life boats, floatation devices and if possible take a moment to inspect the life vest you would be using if there were an accident.

There have been at least three cases in which small quantities of drugs have been placed by unknown persons in unsecured pockets of tourists' checked bags, including backpacks, en route to the Galapagos.  Upon arrival, these drugs have been detected by police canine units, and the owners of the bags have been arrested and detained for months while the cases are resolved.  Travelers are advised to secure all parts of their bags thoroughly before checking them on flights to the Galapagos.

Strikes and disturbances by local fisherman in the Galapagos Islands have become violent on occasion.  While tourists have not been targeted, the incidents affected their movement and access to some sites.  Such disturbances have been minimal since April 2004, but the issue remains unsettled and could resurface at any time.

The islands are over 600 miles from the mainland and help may be slow in arriving in case of emergency.  The Government of Ecuador has very limited search and rescue capabilities.  Travelers to the Galapagos are encouraged to contact tour operators and visit the Bureau of Consular Affairs' web site for the most recent information when planning their trips to the Galapagos.

OTHER LEGAL ISSUES: Under Ecuadorian law, business disputes that normally would be handled by civil litigation in the United States may be converted into criminal proceedings.  This provision of the law has been used to impose travel prohibitions against resident U.S. citizens, and it also has led to the arrest and incarceration of U.S. business people while they were awaiting a hearing on the civil matter.

When considering purchasing property in Ecuador, Americans should be aware that competing claims to property might only surface after an apparently legal sale has been made.  Deficiencies in the Ecuadorian system for surveying and registering property and weaknesses in the judicial system mean that these disputes can last years.  The Mission is aware of several cases of American citizen land owners in Ecuador being threatened with physical harm and/or confiscation of their property by individuals claiming rights to the land, and, in at least one case, buildings have been razed.  American citizens considering buying property in Ecuador should engage a competent attorney and carefully research land title issues before making a purchase.

DISASTER PREPAREDNESS:

Ecuador has 19 potentially active volcanoes, including nine that have shown recent activity.  Earthquakes occur frequently.  Three active volcanoes within 50 kilometers of Quito pose a significant threat to the city: Guagua Pichincha, Cotopaxi, and Reventador.  The primary threat is from failures of transportation, water, communications, and power systems due to heavy ash fall and damage to infrastructure outside the city.  Air transportation is especially vulnerable.  Potentially serious respiratory problems are caused by inhalation of ash.

The town of Baños, a popular tourist destination approximately 120 kilometers south of Quito, is at the base of the Tungurahua Volcano.  Tungurahua has erupted explosively several times since 1999, most recently in February of 2008, causing deaths and forcing thousands to evacuate their homes.  Explosive eruptions can occur with little warning.  The resulting flows of mud and lava could pose a significant and immediate threat to Banos and other population centers in the vicinity.  Travelers should to be aware of these conditions when choosing to stay overnight in Banos, especially on the western side of the town, and should be ready to evacuate on short notice.  If in Baños when a volcanic eruption occurs, it is advisable to try to reach the evacuation shelters on the east side of town, within the "Santa Ana" neighbourhood. This is on the main road out of Baños towards Puyo.  Evacuation routes would be marked with yellow arrows throughout the town.  Additionally, there is also a siren system to alert people to evacuate.

Other volcanoes active in Ecuador include Reventador, 100 kilometers east of Quito, and Cotopaxi, 50 kilometers south of Quito.  In 2002, lava and mudflows caused by Reventador volcano closed a major Quito/northern-border highway and volcanic ash blanketed Quito, shutting down the Quito airport for several days.

The Quito City Government and the Ecuadorian Geophysical Institute monitor these volcanoes and issue regular reports on their activity.  In the event of eruptions, travelers should pay close attention to the news media for updates on the situation.  Other volcanoes in Ecuador may also exhibit increased activity at any time.  Further information is available via the Internet from the Ecuadorian Geophysical Institute and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

CUSTOMS REGULATIONS:

Ecuadorian customs authorities may enforce strict regulations concerning temporary importation into or export from Ecuador of items such as firearms, religious materials, antiquities, medications, electronic equipment, and currency.  Contact the Embassy of Ecuador in Washington, DC, or one of Ecuador’s consulates in the United States for specific information regarding customs requirements.

Please see our Customs Information sheet.

MEDICAL FACILITIES AND HEALTH INFORMATION:

Adequate medical and dental care can be readily obtained in the major cities of Ecuador.  In smaller communities and in the Galapagos Islands services are limited, and the quality is variable and generally below U.S. standards.  Ambulances, with or without trained emergency staff, are in critically short supply.  Acute surgical and cardiac services are not available on the Galapagos Islands.  Serious cases must be evacuated to the Ecuadorian mainland or the United States for treatment.  Pharmacies are readily available in any city.  However, the availability of some medications is sporadic, and formulations and brand names will differ from products available in the U.S.  Narcotics and tranquilizers are extremely limited in availability.  “Pharmacists” sometimes prescribe and dispense medications.  These individuals often have little training and prescribe broad-spectrum antibiotics and other inappropriate medications.  Travelers should not seek their advice.  Folk healers and traditional markets offer herbal and folk remedies which should be avoided as formulations are questionable and some components may interact with other prescription medications.

Travelers to Quito (close to 10,000 feet) and other highland areas may require some time to adjust to the altitude, which can adversely affect blood pressure, digestion, and energy level.  Travelers are encouraged to consult with their personal health care providers before undertaking high-altitude travel.  In particular, travelers with heart or lung problems and persons with sickle cell trait may develop serious health complications at high altitudes.

Scuba divers in the Galapagos Islands should be aware of limited facilities for decompression.  A privately owned decompression chamber is available on Santa Cruz Island in the Galapagos Islands.  The Ecuadorian Navy operates a second decompression chamber at the San Eduardo Naval Base in Guayaquil.  Due to the high costs for these services and associated emergency transportation, divers are advised to obtain adequate medical evacuation and divers insurance.

Travelers should be aware of the presence of malaria, dengue fever, and yellow fever in areas of Ecuador below 4,500’ elevation.  Historically there has not been dengue or malaria in the Galapagos archipelago, and yellow fever has only occurred in the Amazon Basin.  Travelers who are on an appropriate anti-malarial drug have a greatly reduced chance of contracting malaria, while vaccine can provide protection against yellow fever.  Avoiding mosquito bites is the only effective prevention for dengue and personal protective measures, such as the use of insect repellents, help to reduce the risk of contracting all of these illnesses.  Travelers who become ill with a fever or flu-like illness while traveling in a high-risk area, and for up to one year thereafter, should seek prompt medical attention.  For additional information on malaria or dengue, protection from insect bites, and anti-malarials, consult the Center for Disease Control and World Health Organization web sites listed below.

The U.S. Department of State is unaware of any HIV/AIDS entry restrictions for visitors to or foreign residents of Ecuador.

For information about outbreaks of infectious diseases abroad, consult the World Health Organization’s (WHO) website.  Further general health information for travelers is available from the WHO.

MEDICAL INSURANCE:

The Department of State strongly urges Americans to consult with their medical insurance company prior to traveling abroad to confirm whether their policy applies overseas and whether it will cover emergency expenses such as a medical evacuation.  Please see our information on medical insurance overseas.

TRAFFIC SAFETY AND ROAD CONDITIONS:

While in a foreign country, U.S. citizens may encounter road conditions that differ significantly from those in the United States.  The information below concerning Ecuador is provided for general reference only, and may not be totally accurate in a particular location or circumstance.

Road travel throughout Ecuador can be dangerous, especially at night.  Many roads are poorly maintained or unmarked.  Heavy rains and mudslides often close or wash out roads.  Heavy fog is common in mountainous areas.  Driving practices differ from U.S. standards.  Inter-urban and inter-provincial bus passengers are often targets of crime, including robbery and sexual assault.

Highways are often unmarked and do not have signs indicating destinations.  Road safety features such as crash barriers and guardrails along steep mountainsides are rare.  In the countryside livestock are often herded along roads or graze on roadsides.  Many roads are used for pedestrian and animal traffic as well as vehicular traffic.  Driving habits vary from region to region.  In general, drivers in Quito and the mountain areas and the Oriente (eastern jungle) drive more slowly, observe traffic signals, and slow down for speed bumps.  Vehicles are reasonably well maintained.  On the coast, drivers have a more liberal approach to vehicle maintenance and traffic regulations.  In all areas buses, both intra-city and intercity, will stop at any point on their route to pick up or drop off passengers.  Speed bumps abound, even on major highways such as the Pan American Highway, to slow traffic.  Drivers turn right and left from any lane and do not yield for pedestrians and cyclists.

Intoxicated drivers can be encountered at any time, but they are especially prevalent on weekends and holidays.

Ecuador’s frontier regions are largely rural, poor, and lack police presence.  Because drug traffickers, criminal organizations, and smugglers of all types use clandestine border crossings to move their goods, the U.S. Embassy advises against driving on all but the most traveled highways.

If you are the driver of a vehicle involved in an automobile accident, you will likely be taken into police custody, especially if injuries are involved.  You are almost certain to spend some time in jail until all parties are satisfied that responsibility has been assigned and adequate financial satisfaction received.  Drivers may face criminal charges if injuries or damages are serious.  When driving your own vehicle or a rented vehicle, be sure to have proper vehicle registration papers with you.

Please refer to our Road Safety page for more information.

AVIATION SAFETY OVERSIGHT:

The U.S. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has assessed the Government of Ecuador's Civil Aviation Authority as being in compliance with International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) aviation safety standards for oversight of Ecuador's air carrier operations.  Further information may be found on the FAA's web site.

CHILDREN'S ISSUES:

For information see our Office of Children’s Issues web pages on intercountry adoption and international parental child abduction.

REGISTRATION / EMBASSY LOCATION:

Americans living or traveling in Ecuador are encouraged to register with the nearest U.S. Embassy or Consulate through the State Department’s travel registration web site so that they can obtain updated information on travel and security within Ecuador.  Americans without Internet access may register directly with the nearest U.S. Embassy or Consulate.  By registering, American citizens make it easier for the Embassy or Consulate to contact them in case of emergency.

The U.S. Embassy in Quito is located at Avigiras E12-170 y Eloy Alfaro.  The telephone during business hours (8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.) is (011) 593 2 398 5000.  For after-hours emergencies use (011) 593 2 398 5000. Within the same city use the last seven digits.  Add the city code for intercity telephone calls.  For further information, visit the Embassy's web site.

The U.S. Consulate General in Guayaquil is located at the corner of 9 de Octubre and Garcia Moreno (near the Hotel Oro Verde); telephone (011-593-4) 232-3570 during business hours (8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.) or 232-1152 for after-hours emergencies; fax (011-593-4) 232-0904.  For further information, visit the Consulate General's web site.

Consular services for U.S. citizens in the Galapagos Islands are provided by the Consulate General in Guayaquil with assistance from a U.S. Consular Agent in Puerto Ayora, Galapagos, at (05) 2526-330 or (05) 2526-296.

The Consular Section in Quito is open for American Citizen Services, including registration, from 1:30 to 4:00 p.m., Monday through Thursday, excluding U.S. and Ecuadorian holidays.  In order to provide better customer service and reduce waiting times, the American Citizen Services section in Guayaquil uses an online appointment system. Appointments are available from 12:00 noon to 4:00 p.m., Monday through Thursday. Notary appointments are Friday, 8:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m., excluding U.S. and Ecuadorian holidays. Walk-in service remains available, but customers with appointments take precedence.  To make an appointment, visit the online appointment website.

This replaces the Country Specific Information for Ecuador dated November 5, 2008 to update sections on Safety and Security, Crime, and Disaster Preparedness.


The UK Foreign & Commonwealth Office also has information regarding Ecuador HERE...

Looking for an Embassy ?, You can also check out our World Wide Embassy Listings Section HERE (For US Citizens) or HERE (For UK Citizens)...

Regards

The SW Team....

 

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