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SECURITY ADVISORY SYSTEM

 The Homeland Security Advisory System is designed to guide our protective measures when specific information to a particular sector or geographic region is received.  It combines threat information with vulnerability assessments and provides communications to public safety officials and the public.
  • Homeland Security Threat Advisories contain actionable information about an incident involving, or a threat targeting, critical national networks or infrastructures or key assets.
  • Homeland Security Information Bulletins communicate information of interest to the nation’s critical infrastructures that do not meet the timeliness, specificity, or significance thresholds of warning messages.
  • Color-coded Threat Level System is used to communicate with public safety officials and the public at-large through a threat-based, color-coded system so that protective measures can be implemented to reduce the likelihood or impact of an attack.

CLICK ON THE THREAT LEVEL PICTURE ABOVE TO ACCESS THE HOMELAND SECURITY PRESIDENTIAL DIRECTIVE 3: HOMELAND SECURITY ADVISORY SYSTEM EXPLANATION


 

 Preparing for a Terrorist Bombing: A Common Sense Approach

Although terrorists use a variety of methods to inflict harm and create fear, bombs are used most frequently. According to the U. S. Federal Bureau of Investigation, bombings accounted for nearly 70 percent of all terrorist attacks in the U.S. and its territories between 1980 and 2001. This document focuses on common sense principles that will be useful in a bombing event.

What can I do now?

CDC and the American Red Cross encourage every organization, family and individual to take time to prepare for an emergency or disaster. These steps can help you get started:

Know your work, school and community disaster plans. If you are not familiar with the plans, contact your supervisor, school administrators, or your local fire department for information.

Identify an alternative hospital. Hospitals closest to the event are always the busiest.

Visit http://www.redcross.org/preparedness. The site provides guidance on creating a disaster plan and steps you can take now to protect yourself and your loved ones.

What should I do if I think someone is going to set off a bomb?

  

At Home

At Work

At School

In Public

Leave the area immediately.

Follow existing evacuation guidelines.

Follow existing evacuation guidelines.

Leave the area immediately.

Call 9-1-1. Tell the operator what you saw or know (suspicious persons, packages, or vehicles).



Call 9-1-1. Tell the operator what you saw or know (suspicious persons, packages, or vehicles).

Follow directions from people in authority (police, fire, EMS, or military personnel, or from neighborhood leaders).

Follow directions from people in authority (police, fire, EMS, or military personnel, or from workplace supervisors).

Follow directions from people in authority (police, fire, EMS, or military personnel, or from school administrators).

Follow directions from people in authority (police, fire, EMS, or military personnel, or from community leaders).


What should I do during a terrorist bombing?

If you are in a bombing event:

Leave the area immediately.

Avoid crowds. Crowds of people may be targeted for a second attack.

Avoid unattended cars and trucks. Unattended cars and trucks may contain explosives.

Stay away from damaged buildings to avoid falling glass and bricks. Move at least 10 blocks or 200 yards away from damaged buildings.

Follow directions from people in authority (police, fire, EMS, or military personnel, or from school or workplace supervisors).

Call the EMERGENCY SERVICES once you are in a safe area, but only if police, fire, or EMS has not arrived.

Help others who are hurt or need assistance to leave the area if you are able. If you see someone who is seriously injured, seek help. Do not try to manage the situation alone.

What should I do after the bombing?

When the explosion is over:

Follow your family, job, or school emergency disaster plan for leaving and staying away from the scene of the event. Remember, returning to the scene will increase the risk of danger for rescue workers and you.

Avoid crowds. Crowds of people may be targeted for a second attack.

Avoid unattended cars and trucks. Unattended cars and trucks may contain explosives.

Stay away from damaged buildings to avoid falling glass and bricks. Move at least 10 blocks or 200 yards away from damaged buildings.

Follow directions from people in authority (police, fire, EMS, or military personnel, or from school or workplace supervisors).

Call the EMERGENCY SERVICES once you are in a safe area, but only if police, fire, or EMS has not arrived to help injured people.

Help others who are hurt or need assistance to leave the area if you are able. If you see someone who is seriously injured, seek help. Do not try to manage the situation alone.

Listen to your radio or television for news and instructions.

What if rescue workers are not available to transport me or other injured persons?

Emergency services (police, fire, EMS and ambulance) might be delayed indefinitely following a terrorist event, therefore:

Always have a back-up plan for transportation.

Follow advice from your local public safety offices (local health department, local emergency management offices, fire and police departments and reliable news sources).

When should I go to the hospital or clinic?

Seek medical attention if you have any of the following problems:

Excessive bleeding

Trouble breathing

Persistent cough

Trouble walking or using an arm or leg

Stomach, back or chest pains

Headache

Blurred vision or burning eyes

Dry mouth

Vomiting or diarrhea

Rash or burning skin

Hearing problems

Injuries that increase in pain, redness or swelling

Injuries that do not improve after 24 to 48 hours

Help others who are hurt or need assistance to leave the area, if you are able.If you see someone who is seriously injured, seek help. Do not try to manage the situation alone.

Where should I go for care?

Go to a hospital or clinic away from the event if you can. Most victims will go to the nearest hospital. Hospitals away from the event will be less busy.

What can I expect at the hospital?

Long waits. To avoid long waits, choose a hospital farther away from the event. While this might increase your travel time, you might receive care sooner.

Triage. Following a terrorist attack or other disasters, injuries are generally treated on a “worst first” basis, called “triage.” Triage is not “first come, first served”. If your injuries are not immediately life threatening, others might be treated before you. The goal of triage is to save as many lives as possible.

Limited information. In a large-scale emergency such as a terrorist attack, police, fire, EMS, and even hospitals and clinics cannot track every individual by name. Keep in mind that it may be difficult for hospitals to provide information about loved ones following a terrorist attack. Be patient as you seek information.

For more information about how to prepare for a terrorist bombing and other disasters, click on the related links:

 


 

 

Red Cross Disaster Advice

 http://www.redcross.org/services/disaster/0,1082,0_589_,00.html.

Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA),

http://www.fema.gov.

Mass casualties and injuries from terrorism, CDC’s Emergency Preparedness and Response Website.

 http://emergency.cdc.gov.

United States Department of Homeland Security,

http://www.ready.gov.

1. U.S. Department of Justice, Federal Bureau of Investigation, Terrorism 1980-2001.

www.fbi.gov/publications/terror/terror2000_2001.htm

 

 


 

After a Terrorist Bombing: Health and Safety Information for the General Public

Immediately after the event

If you or others have life-threatening injuries, such as severe bleeding, difficulty breathing, chest pain, or burns, provide or seek first aid and get help from officials or others at the scene.

If you or someone else has minor injuries seek first aid as a first step until those more severely injured can be cared for first. If possible, go to a hospital that is not in the immediate area of the blast. Hospitals closest to the blast(s) will quickly become crowded.

Listen to emergency officials at the scene. If no one is near you to give instructions and you are in the immediate area of the blast(s), leave as soon as you can.

To keep safe, move away from the area. Avoid crowds, unattended cars and trucks, public transportation, and damaged buildings.

Hospitals and roads will become crowded quickly, which can make it difficult for emergency workers to care for severely injured patients. If you have loved ones who are not with you, and who are not in the area of the blast(s), call and tell them to avoid driving to the area.

Follow the instructions of local officials who are responding to this situation. Listen to the television news, radio, or Internet to stay informed.

Hours or days after the event

Until authorities learn more about the situation, stay away from the area of the blast(s).

Stay informed by turning to the radio, television, or Internet news for updated health and safety announcements during the immediate hours after the event.

Even if the bomb or explosion doesn’t cause physical injuries, it can cause fear, confusion, and uncertainty. It is normal to have strong feelings after such an event. You may feel sad, helpless, anxious, dazed, or even numb. These are all normal reactions to stress.

There is no simple fix to make things better right away. But there are actions that can help you, your family, and your community heal.

Try to:

Follow a normal routine as much as possible.

Eat healthy meals. Be careful not to skip meals or to overeat.

Exercise and stay active.

Help other people in your community as a volunteer. Stay busy.

Accept help from family, friends, co-workers, or clergy. Talk about your feelings with them.

Limit your time around the sights and sounds of what happened. Don’t dwell on TV, radio, or newspaper reports on the tragedy.

If you or someone you know is having trouble dealing with the tragedy, ask for help. Asking for help is smart. Talk to a counselor, your doctor, or community organization, such as the suicide prevention hotline (1-800-273-TALK) or the American Red Cross (1-866-GET-INFO)

How to get more information

Federal, State, and local officials are working together to help people who have been affected by the blast and will provide updated information as soon as they learn more.

For more information on bombings and other types of mass casualties, go to emergency.cdc.gov/masscasualties or call the CDC Hotline at 1-800-CDC-INFO.

A traumatic event turns your world upside down.

After surviving a disaster or act of violence, people may feel dazed or even numb. They may also feel sad, helpless, or anxious. In spite of the tragedy, some people just feel happy to be alive.

It is not unusual to have bad memories or dreams. You may avoid places or people that remind you of the disaster. You might have trouble sleeping, eating, or paying attention. Many people have short tempers and get angry easily.

These are all normal reactions to stress.

It will take time before you start to feel better.

You may have strong feelings right away. Or you may not notice a change until much later, after the crisis is over. Stress can change how you act with your friends and family. It will take time for you to feel better and for your life to return to normal. Give yourself time to heal.

These steps may help you feel better.

A traumatic event disrupts your life. There is no simple fix to make things better right away. But there are actions that can help you, your family, and your community heal. Try to:

Follow a normal routine as much as possible.

Eat healthy meals. Be careful not to skip meals or to overeat.

Exercise and stay active.

Help other people in your community as a volunteer. Stay busy.

Accept help from family, friends, co-workers, or clergy. Talk about your feelings with them.

Limit your time around the sights and sounds of what happened. Don’t dwell on TV, radio, or newspaper reports on the tragedy.

Sometimes the stress can be too much to handle alone.

Ask for help if you:

Are not able to take care of yourself or your children.

Are not able to do your job.

Use alcohol or drugs to get away from your problems.

Feel sad or depressed for more than two weeks

Think about suicide.

If you or someone you know is having trouble dealing with the tragedy, ask for help. Talk to a counselor, your doctor, or community organization, such as the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline (1-800-273-TALK).

We have also accumulated a list of specialist agencies, government and civilian sector that can help and give advice with regards to Terrorism Crisis Management.


 

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