FCO TRAVEL ALERTS

THE SOS GROUP
SOS-BANNER-SWADV

BodyGuard / Medical Courses from the SOS GROUP

Click on the Logo !

STREIT Armored Cars

Streit-Armored-Logo

Global Leader in Armored Transportation !!!

ADT Home Security
The Security Website : ADT Alarm Systems

For Specialised ADT

Home Security Solutions

Please Click HERE

SIRAS ACADEMY

Siras-Academy-RSBanner-

Close Protection Courses from the SIRAS ACADEMY

Click on the Logo !

University of St Andrews

St_Andrews_CT_Course_Banner

Terrorism Studies Course from The University of St Andrews ENROLLING NOW !!

TTF DIRECTORY

THIRTYTF_LOGO

 

Aviation Security Directory from TTF

Click on the Logo !

Travel Security Advice

Sub Menu

Travel Security Advice for New Zealand

New_Zealand_National_Flag

new_zealand_mapNew_Zealand_Overview


COUNTRY DESCRIPTION:

New Zealand is a highly developed, stable parliamentary democracy, which recognizes the British monarch as sovereign. It has a modern economy, and tourist facilities are widely available. The New Zealand Tourist Board website has a wide range of information of interest to travelers. Read the Department of State Background Notes on New Zealand for additional information.



REGISTRATION / EMBASSY LOCATION:

U.S. citizens living or traveling in New Zealand are encouraged to register at the Department of State’s travel registration page in order to obtain updated information on local travel and security. U.S. citizens without Internet access may register directly with the U.S. Consulate General in Auckland. Registration is important; it allows the State Department to assist U.S. citizens in an emergency.

The U.S. Embassy in Wellington is located at 29 Fitzherbert Terrace, Thorndon, Wellington, New Zealand. The telephone number is (64) (4) 462-6000. The fax number is (64) (4) 499-0490. The U.S. Embassy in Wellington does not have a consular section and thus cannot provide consular services to U.S. citizens. All consular services for U.S. citizens are provided by the Consulate General in Auckland.

The U.S. Consulate General in Auckland is located on the third floor of the Citigroup Centre, 23 Customs Street East, between Commerce and Queen Streets. The telephone number is (64) (9) 303-2724. The fax number is (64) (9) 366-0870. The Consulate General in Auckland handles all consular matters in New Zealand.

For after-hours emergencies anywhere in New Zealand, a duty officer can be contacted by calling (64) (4) 462-6000; after listening to a brief recording, the caller may leave a message on the voice mail system, describing the nature of the emergency and giving a point of contact. The phone system will automatically call the duty officer in Wellington or in Auckland, who will listen to the message and take the appropriate action.



ENTRY / EXIT REQUIREMENTS:

U.S. citizens eligible for a visa waiver do not need a visa for tourist stays of three months or less. For more information about visa waivers and entry requirements, contact the Embassy of New Zealand in Wash, DC: 37 Observatory Circle NW, Washington, DC 20008, USA - Tel: (202) 328-4800; or the Consulate General of New Zealand in Los Angeles: 2425 Olympic Blvd Suite 600E, Santa Monica, CA 90404 USA - Tel: (310) 566-6555, Opt 0 Visit the Embassy of New Zealand for the most current visa information.

The Department of State is unaware of any HIV/AIDS entry restrictions for visitors to or foreign residents of New Zealand.

Information about dual nationality or the prevention of international child abduction can be found on our website. For further information about customs regulations, please read our Customs Information page.



SAFETY AND SECURITY:

U.S. citizens in New Zealand should review their personal security practices, be alert to any unusual activity around their homes or businesses, and report any significant incidents to local police.

For the latest security information, U.S. citizens traveling abroad should regularly monitor the Department of State's Bureau of Consular Affairs' website.

Up-to-date information on safety and security can also be obtained by calling 1-888-407-4747 toll-free within the U.S. and Canada, or by calling a regular toll line, 1-202-501-4444, from other countries. These numbers are available from 8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. Eastern Time, Monday through Friday (except U.S. federal holidays).

The Department of State urges U.S. citizens to take responsibility for their own personal security while traveling overseas. For general information about appropriate measures travelers can take to protect themselves in an overseas environment, see the Department of State’s extensive tips and advice on traveling safely abroad.



CRIME:

Crime rates in New Zealand are low but have increased in recent years. The most prevalent crime is theft or attempted theft from cars, camper vans, and hostels. To help protect against theft, do not leave passports or other valuable items in unattended vehicles. Violent crime against tourists is unusual; however, visitors who are traveling alone should be especially vigilant and avoid isolated areas that are not frequented by the public.

In many countries around the world, counterfeit and pirated goods are widely available. Transactions involving such products may be illegal under local law. In addition, bringing them back to the United States may result in forfeitures and/or fines.



INFORMATION FOR VICTIMS OF CRIME:

If you are the victim of a crime abroad, you should contact the local police and the U.S. Consulate General in Auckland (see the Department of State’s list of embassies and consulates ). This includes the loss or theft of a U.S. passport. The consulate staff can, for example, help you find appropriate medical care, contact family members or friends, and explain how funds may be transferred. Although the investigation and prosecution of the crime are solely the responsibility of local authorities, consular officers can help you to understand the local criminal justice process and to find an attorney if needed. In New Zealand, a private organization called Victim Support works both independently and with the NZ Police to assist victims of crime. Victim Support is available 24 hours per day on 0800-842-846, 0800-Victim, or by e-mail.

The local equivalent to the "911" emergency line in New Zealand is 111.

Please see our information on victims of crime, including possible victim compensation programs in the United States.



CRIMINAL PENALTIES:

While in a foreign country, a U.S. citizen is subject to that country's laws and regulations, which sometimes differ significantly from those in the United States and may not afford the protections available to the individual under U.S. law. Penalties for breaking the law can be more severe than in the United States for similar offenses. Persons violating New Zealand laws, even unknowingly, may be expelled, arrested or imprisoned. Penalties for possession of, use of, or trafficking in illegal drugs in New Zealand are severe, and convicted offenders can expect long jail sentences and heavy fines. Engaging in sexual conduct with children or using or disseminating child pornography in a foreign country is a crime, prosecutable in the United States.



SPECIAL CIRCUMSTANCES:

Some heavily populated parts of New Zealand are in areas of very high seismic activity. General information about natural disaster preparedness is available from the U.S. Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA).

Adventure Sports: Many tourists come to New Zealand to participate in extreme adventure sports, such as bungee jumping, sky diving, hiking, rappelling, climbing, motorcycling, and kayaking. All too often, injuries and even death result from participation in such activities. Travelers are advised to employ caution and common sense when engaging in adventure sports. Never participate in such sports alone, always carry identification, and let someone else know where you are at all times. Before kayaking, check the river conditions and wear a life jacket. When hiking, rappelling, or climbing, carry a first aid kit, know the location of the nearest rescue center, and bring a friend along.

Imports: New Zealand is an island nation, and the government is serious about preserving its delicate ecosystem. The Ministry of Agriculture and Forestry (MAF) imposes strict regulations regarding what can be imported into New Zealand. People failing to declare goods that could be quarantined can be fined up to $100,000 NZ and/or face up to five years in prison. People failing to declare risk goods such as fresh fruit, seeds, and plants can receive an instant fine of $200 NZ. When importing a pet, thorough veterinary documentation and a quarantine period are required. Unfinished wood products, used hiking shoes, gardening tools, fresh food items, and items such as used pet carriers may be seized and destroyed by MAF. For more information please visit the Biosecurity New Zealand website.



MEDICAL FACILITIES AND HEALTH INFORMATION:

Quality medical care is widely available, but waiting lists exist for certain types of treatment. High-quality medication (both over-the-counter and prescription) is widely available at local pharmacies, although the name of the product may differ from the U.S. versions. Serious medical problems requiring hospitalization and/or medical evacuation to the United States can cost thousands of dollars. Doctors and hospitals often expect immediate cash payment for health services.

Information on vaccinations and other health precautions, such as safe food and water precautions and insect bite protection, may be obtained from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) hotline for international travelers at 1-877-FYI-TRIP (1-877-394-8747) or via the CDC website. For information about outbreaks of infectious diseases abroad, consult the infectious diseases section of the World Health Organization (WHO) website. The WHO website also contains additional health information for travelers, including detailed country-specific health information.



MEDICAL INSURANCE:

The Department of State strongly urges U.S. citizens to consult their medical insurance company prior to traveling abroad to determine whether the policy applies overseas and whether it covers emergency expenses such as a medical evacuation. For more information, please see our medical insurance overseas page.



TRAFFIC SAFETY AND ROAD CONDITIONS:

While in a foreign country, U.S. citizens may encounter road conditions that differ significantly from those in the United States. The information below concerning New Zealand is provided for general reference only.

All traffic travels on the left in New Zealand, and drivers should exercise extra caution if accustomed to driving on the right. Driving on the wrong side of the road is a leading cause of serious injury and death for U.S. tourists. Cars turning left must yield to oncoming cars that are turning right. Proceed carefully through intersections. Traffic circles are common throughout New Zealand. When approaching a traffic circle, always yield to traffic coming from the right – noting that traffic already in the circle has the right-of-way-- and merge to the left into the circle. Red means “stop” – do not turn at a red light.

New Zealand has only 100 miles of multilane divided motorways. Most intercity travel is accomplished on two lane roads. While these are in good condition, New Zealand's rugged terrain means motorists often encounter sharper curves and steeper grades than those found on the U.S. Interstate Highway System. Renting a car or camper is a popular way to enjoy New Zealand's natural beauty, but visitors unfamiliar with local conditions should drive particularly conservatively. Posted speed limit signs should be observed. Drivers should use caution to avoid animals when driving in rural areas. Please note that on large portions of scenic highway in the South Island, which can be quite remote and where travelers will often see little or no traffic, there is very limited cell phone coverage.

Pedestrians are advised to look carefully in all directions before crossing a street or roadway and to use crosswalks. Pedestrians do not have the right of way except in crosswalks. New Zealand law requires that cars yield to pedestrians in a crosswalk, and that cars stop at least two meters (approximately 6 feet) from a crosswalk that is in use.

Public transportation, including buses, trains and taxis, is for the most part reliable and safe.

In case of emergency, phone the local police at 111.

Please refer to our Road Safety page for more information. For specific information concerning the operation and rental of motor vehicles, contact the New Zealand Tourist Board website or the Land Transport Safety Authority website.



AVIATION SAFETY OVERSIGHT:

The U.S. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has assessed the government of New Zealand’s Civil Aviation Authority as being in compliance with International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) aviation safety standards for oversight of New Zealand’s air carrier operations. Further information may be found on the FAA’s safety assessment page .

CHILDREN'S ISSUES:

Please see our Office of Children’s Issues web pages on intercountry adoption and international parental child abduction.

This replaces the Country Specific Information for New Zealand dated April 16, 2009, without substantive changes.

 


The UK Foreign & Commonwealth Office has information regarding New Zealand HERE....

Looking for an Embassy ? You can also check out our World Wide Embassies Listings Section HERE (For US Citizens) or HERE (For UK Citizens)........... 

Regards

The SW Team.......

 

Direct Gov Travel News and Alerts