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Travel Security Advice for Slovenia

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COUNTRY DESCRIPTION:  

Slovenia operates under a parliamentary democracy.  In May 2004, Slovenia became a member of the European Union.  Tourist facilities are widely available throughout the country.  Read the Department of State’s Background Notes on Slovenia for additional information.



REGISTRATION:  

Americans living or traveling in Slovenia are encouraged to register with the nearest U.S. Embassy or Consulate through the State Department’s travel registration web site so that they can obtain updated information on travel and security within Slovenia.Americans without Internet access may register directly with the U.S. Embassy.  By registering, American citizens make it easier for the Embassy to contact them in case of emergency



ENTRY/EXIT REQUIREMENTS: 

Slovenia is a party to the Schengen agreement.  As such, U.S. citizens may enter Slovenia for up to 90 days for tourist or business purposes without a visa.  The passport should be valid for at least three months beyond the period of stay.  For further details about travel into and within Schengen countries, please see our Schengen fact sheet . A valid passport is required. Slovene authorities may confiscate passports with signs of damage, such as missing pages, as suspicious documents, potentially causing travel delays.  American citizens entering and exiting Slovenia by personal vehicle are required to have a valid U.S. and International Driver’s License (see our information on Road Safety ); otherwise they may be refused entry into the country and/or fined.

All non-EU citizens staying longer than 3 days in Slovenia must register with the local police within 3 days of arrival and inform the office about any change in their address. Registration of foreign visitors staying in hotels or accommodations rented through an accommodation company is done automatically by the hotelier or accommodation company, but visitors staying with family members must register themselves.  Registration is available 24 hours a day at police stations and is free of charge. Failure to register can result in a significant fine of up to 400 euros.

Note: Although European Union regulations require that non-EU visitors obtain a stamp in their passport upon initial entry to a Schengen country, many borders are not staffed with officers carrying out this function. If an American citizen wishes to ensure that his or her entry is properly documented, it may be necessary to request a stamp at an official point of entry. Under local law, travelers without a stamp in their passport may be questioned and asked to document the length of their stay in Schengen countries at the time of departure or at any other point during their visit, and could face possible fines or other repercussions if unable to do so.

Americans are permitted to stay up to 90 days within any six-month period.  For further information on entry requirements for Slovenia, travelers may contact the Embassy of Slovenia at 2410 California Street, NW, Washington, D.C. 20008, tel. (202) 386-6610; the Consulate General of Slovenia in New York City, tel. (2l2) 370-3006; or the Consulate General in Cleveland, Ohio, tel. (216) 589-9220.  Visit the
Embassy of Slovenia’s web site for the most current visa information. Visit the website of Slovenia’s national tourist office for additional tourist information.

Information about dual nationality or the prevention of international child abduction can be found on our web site.  For further information about customs regulations, please read our Customs Information sheet.

SAFETY AND SECURITY:  

Slovenia remains largely free of terrorist incidents.  This assessment takes into account historical data relevant to terrorist activities and recent reporting indicating whether acts could be conducted without prior advance warnings.  However, like other countries in the Schengen area, Slovenia shares open borders with its Western European neighbors, allowing the possibility of terrorist groups entering/exiting the country with anonymity. Americans are reminded to remain vigilant with regard to their personal security and to exercise caution

There are occasional political demonstrations in city centers in Slovenia.  They occur most often in central Ljubljana in areas around Kongresni Trg (Congress Square), in front of the Parliament building, around other government facilities, and, at times, near the American Embassy.  These demonstrations are usually peaceful and generally are not anti-American in nature.  However, there have been demonstrations that voiced anti-American sentiments.   American citizens should keep in mind that even demonstrations intended to be peaceful can turn confrontational and possibly escalate into violence.  American citizens are therefore urged to avoid the areas of demonstrations if possible, and to exercise caution if within the vicinity of any demonstrations.  For additional information, Americans are encouraged to check the Embassy’s web site or call the Embassy at 386-1-200-5595 or 200-5599 (200-5556 after hours and on weekends/holidays).

For the latest security information, Americans traveling abroad should regularly monitor the Department of State’s Bureau of Consular Affairs website,

Up-to-date information on safety and security can also be obtained by calling 1-888-407-4747 toll-free in the U.S. and Canada, or by calling a regular toll line, 1-202-501-4444, from other countries.  These numbers are available from 8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. Eastern Time, Monday through Friday (except U.S. federal holidays).

The Department of State urges American citizens to take responsibility for their own personal security while traveling overseas.  For general information about appropriate measures travelers can take to protect themselves in an overseas environment, see the Department of State’s A Safe Trip Abroad .

 

CRIME:  

 

Slovenia’s overall crime rate is low and violent crimes are relatively uncommon.  Most crimes tend to be non-violent and directed towards obtaining personal property, such as purse-snatching, pick-pocketing, and residential and vehicle break-ins.  Visitors should take normal security precautions and are requested to report any incidents to the local police.

Vehicle break-in/theft is a continuous problem in Slovenia.  Individuals should always lock vehicles, use vehicle anti-theft devices, park in well-lighted areas, and secure vehicles in residential or hotel garages.

Residential burglaries occur where there are security vulnerabilities and/or where residents are not implementing residential security practices.  Recent burglary reports indicate access was gained when doors were not properly secured with an appropriate lock.



INFORMATION FOR VICTIMS OF CRIME: 

The loss or theft abroad of a U.S. passport should be reported immediately to the local police and the nearest U.S. Embassy or Consulate.  If you are the victim of a crime while overseas, in addition to reporting to local police, please contact the nearest U.S. Embassy or Consulate for assistance.  The Embassy/Consulate staff can, for example, assist you to find appropriate medical care, contact family members or friends and explain how funds may be transferred.  Although the investigation and prosecution of the crime are solely the responsibility of local authorities, consular officers can help you to understand the local criminal justice process and to find an attorney if needed. 

The local equivalent to the “911” emergency line in Slovenia is 113.

Please see our information on Victims of Crime, including possible victim compensation programs in the United States.



CRIMINAL PENALTIES: 

While in a foreign country, a U.S. citizen is subject to that country's laws and regulations, which sometimes differ significantly from those in the United States and may not afford the protections available to the individual under U.S. law.  Penalties for breaking the law can be more severe than in the United States for similar offenses.  Persons violating Slovenian laws, even unknowingly, may be expelled, arrested or imprisoned.  Penalties for possession, use, or trafficking in illegal drugs in Slovenia are severe, and convicted offenders can expect long jail sentences and heavy fines.  Engaging in sexual conduct with children or using or disseminating child pornography in a foreign country is a crime, prosecutable in the United States.  Please see our information on Criminal Penalties.



SPECIAL CIRCUMSTANCES:  

Slovenia became a member of the European Union in May 2004.  Its customs regulations have been fully harmonized with those of the E.U.  Please see our Customs Information.



MEDICAL FACILITIES AND HEALTH INFORMATION: 

Adequate medical care is readily available.  Travelers to Slovenia may obtain a list of English-speaking physicians at the U.S. Embassy.  Antibiotics, as well as other American-equivalent prescription medications are available at local pharmacies.  In Slovenia all medications, including drugs considered over-the–counter and first aid supplies, are dispensed through pharmacies (“lekarna”).  For those persons who engage in outdoor activities, a vaccine to prevent tick-borne encephalitis is recommended.

The U.S. Department of State is unaware of any HIV/AIDS entry restrictions for visitors or foreign residents of Slovenia.

Information on vaccinations and other health precautions, such as safe food and water precautions and insect bite protection, may be obtained from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s hotline for international travelers at 1-877-FYI-TRIP (1-877-394-8747) or via the CDC’s website For information about outbreaks of infectious diseases abroad consult the World Health Organization’s (WHO) websiteFurther health information for travelers is available from the WHO.



MEDICAL INSURANCE: 

The Department of State strongly urges Americans to consult with their medical insurance company prior to traveling abroad to confirm whether their policy applies overseas and whether it will cover emergency expenses such as a medical evacuation.  Please see our information on medical insurance overseas.



TRAFFIC SAFETY AND ROAD CONDITIONS: 

While in a foreign country, U.S. citizens may encounter road conditions that differ significantly from those in the United States.  The information below concerning Slovenia is provided for general reference only, and may not be totally accurate in a particular location or circumstance.

Slovenia has a well-developed road network that is safe for travel.  Highways connect to neighboring cities and countries and are clearly sign-posted; road signs and traffic rules are consistent with those used throughout Europe.  As the number of cars in Slovenia continues to rise, roads are becoming more heavily congested during the weekends on major routes and during rush hours.  Parking is difficult and can be expensive in the center of Ljubljana.  Traffic moves on the right.  Third party liability insurance is required for all vehicles; coverage is purchased locally.  Travelers should be alert to aggressive drivers both in cities and on highways.  Many of the serious accidents in Slovenia occur as a result of high-speed driving.  Emergency roadside help and information may be found by dialing 1-987 for vehicle assistance and towing services, 112 for an ambulance or fire brigade, and 113 for police.  By Slovene law, the maximum legal blood-alcohol limit for drivers is 0.05.

U.S. visitors or U.S. residents in Slovenia must be in possession of both a valid U.S. driver’s license and an International Driver’s License in order to drive in Slovenia.  International Driver’s Licenses are valid for a maximum of one year, after which residents of Slovenia are required to obtain a Slovene driver's license.  Current information about traffic and road conditions is available in English from the Automobile Association of Slovenia by calling (01) 530-5300 and from the Traffic Information Center for public roads.

The speed limit is 50kph/30 mph in urban areas, 130 kph/80 mph on expressways (the avtocesta).  Motorists are required to have their headlights on during the daytime; drivers and passengers alike must wear seat belts; motorcyclists and their passengers must wear approved helmets.  The use of handheld cellular telephones while driving is prohibited in Slovenia. 

Highway vignettes are obligatory for all vehicles with the permissible maximum weight of 3,500 kg on motorways and expressways in Slovenia.  A one-year vignette costs EUR 95.00; a monthly vignette costs EUR 30.00; a weekly vignette costs EUR 15.00; for motorcycles, the one-year vignette is EUR 47.50; the half-year vignette is EUR 25.00 and the weekly vignette is EUR 7.50.

A one-year vignette for the current year is valid from December 1st of the previous year to January 31st of the next year (a total of 14 months). The monthly vignette is valid from the date of purchase until the end of the day with the same number one month after purchase, or, if there is no such day in the following month, until the end of the last day of the month. The weekly vignette is valid for seven consecutive days from the date specified by the user upon purchase. Using motorways and expressways without a valid and properly-displayed vignette in a vehicle is considered a violation of the law; violators may be fined between EUR 300 and 800. In addition to this fine, a new sticker must be purchased and displayed on the vehicle. 

Vignettes can be purchased in Slovenia at petrol stations, newsstands, automobile clubs, post offices (Posta Slovenije), and some toll stations, and also at petrol stations in neighboring countries.

Please refer to our Road Safety page for more information.  Visit the website of Slovenia’s national tourist office and national authority responsible for road safety.



AVIATION SAFETY OVERSIGHT: 

As there is no direct commercial air service to the United States by carriers registered in Slovenia, the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has not assessed Slovenia’s Civil Aviation Authority for compliance with International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) aviation safety standards.  For more information, travelers may visit the FAA’s website.



CHILDREN'S ISSUES: 

For information see our Office of Children’s Issues web pages on intercountry adoption and international parental child abduction



EMBASSY LOCATION:  

Americans living or traveling in Slovenia are encouraged to register with the nearest U.S. Embassy or Consulate through the State Department’s travel registration web site so that they can obtain updated information on travel and security within Slovenia.Americans withoutInternet access may register directly with the U.S. Embassy.  By registering, American citizens make it easier for the Embassy to contact them in case of emergency.  The U.S. Embassy is located at Presernova 31, Ljubljana 1000, tel.: (386)(1) 200-5500 or fax: (386)(1) 200-5535. 


This replaces the Country Specific Information for Slovenia dated March 2, 2009, without substantive changes. 


The UK Foreign & Commonwealth Office also has information regarding travel to Slovenia HERE....

Looking for an Embassy ?, You can also check out our World Wide Embassies Section HERE (For US Citizens) or HERE (For UK Citizens)......

Regards

The SW Team.......

 

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